Sale paper


In the spirit of spring cleaning, I decided to evaluate my scrapbooking closet.  This closet is my pride and joy. Because I installed (okay, the Man installed) my scrapbooking workdesk in an actual closet, I can close the door to keep the Maiden from deciding she wants to contribute to the half-done pages.  The desk is full of everything one might possibly need to self-immerse in scrapbooking nirvana: dozens of stacks of sheets of patterned, vellum, sparkly, foil, and textured paper; stickers of all shapes, sizes and dimensions; sundry embellishments; jagged, wavy, curly, and other oddly-shaped scissors; and about twenty gluesticks (because you never want to run out).   Each item is neatly sorted into its appropriate drawer or laid out on an accessible shelf.  And my scrapbooks– one for each state we’ve lived in (so, five, plus our wedding scrapbook, plus the Maiden’s scrapbook) are on the desk corner, waiting to be filled by the pictures and souvenirs that are overflowing out of a two-drawer filing cabinet elsewhere in the office.  My current page projects are sitting next to the paper cutter, waiting for completion.

It’s all so perfect, but there’s only one thing missing.

Progress.

In the “Notes” section of my day planner, I keep a running list of all the scrapbooking pages I have yet to do.  Never mind that the list goes back to 2003.  It serves as inspiration when I decide to begin a new scrapbook page: which entry/event/trip/day/stage in the Maiden’s life/random catch-all for Summer 2008 pictures that don’t belong anywhere else page strikes a chord with me that day?

Every January, I painstakingly copy this list into my new planner (it’s one of those “necessary” procrastination techniques I love so well).  During the year, I cross out the page title when I actually make the page, so essentially, the list also becomes a record of all the scrapbooking I’ve done.  When I copied over the list this January, I realized that last year, I completed three scrapbook pages.

That’s right, three.

But it gets better.

To procrastinate, I dug out last year’s financial spreadsheet to determine how much I spent on scrapbooking accessories.  Including the cost of printing photos, the total I spent on scrapbooking supplies– that perfect paper, those cute stickers, and the sale stuff which will almost certainly come in handy at some point, won’t it?–came to about $300.

Holy smokes.  I made 3 pages for $300.  That’s, essentially, $100 a page.

With a price tag like that, no wonder I’m so picky about how they turn out.

It’s not that I don’t like scrapbooking.  And I don’t want to switch to digital scrapbooking, since I love doing it hands-on.  I’m  just desperately perfectionist and time-strapped, which is a bad combination. Then, of course, I come across a sale on paper at the arts and crafts store, and although I know I definitely do not need more scrapping paper, the price is just so good, and the possibilities so exciting, that I can’t resist.  One swipe of the credit card later, and the paper becomes a resident of my scrapbooking desk, in whose dark recesses it will live untouched for the next six years.

I’m always promising myself that this month, I’m going to be productive and start catching up on my books.  Hope springs eternal, and so does my money.  From my wallet.  Into the cash register at Michael’s.

I’ve come to a conclusion.  Scrapbooking is fun, but it’s not where my true interests lie.  I’m not a scrapper.  My hobby: shopping for scrapbooking supplies!

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One response to “Sale paper

  1. Pingback: GROC talk « The Twisting Kaleidoscope

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